Lone candle snuffed out by a bitter wind hell bent on destroying this spark of greatness…zara

No tears now,

Peace at last for this angel whose gentle smiles lit up the tiniest crevices where fear found abode.

Stranger, not friend; yet tears roll silently down these faces as word arrives that this star is gone home to rest among shiny lights and angels in clouds afar.

Long lonely road to get you right where you are,

But now no tears, no more pain: no joy has left these hearts.

Now peace with the memory that you brought with you laughter, your voice and your blessed heart.

Loaded you came to give of you selflessly,

Now empty of all earthly treasures you return to the maker head held high,

Shoulders straight, confident in the fact that you have shared your gifts with all who passed you along the way…


Posted: March 11, 2014 in Just Stuff, Poetry
Tags: , , ,

I’m merely a dreamer, and you are my dream,
You stroll through my mind your face unseen,
But presence strongly felt.
Your laughter rings through the cosmic divide,
As I breathlessly long for your warm touch.

Like an ice cream thief, you have coldly stolen my heart with this joy you have brought.
You remain in my mind, effortlessly creating consciousness of you, despite the many distractions I find.

The hours go by, and still I see you clearly from within my minds eye,
Your sparkling eyes shining like diamonds,
They touch my soul, as I watch you blend into my dreams,
I am drunk in love, intoxicated by you it seems.

You have invaded my soul, my dream,
I need to inhale you to make me whole.
Just give me wings but for a time,
I’ll dream a world where you are mine.

I dream. Just because you are…

ADAPTED from I Dream of You by Cosmic Dreamer

Ayo Sogunro

Dear Sadiq Abacha,

I do not know you personally, but I admire your filial bravery—however misguided—in defending the honour of your father, the late General Sani Abacha. This in itself is not a problem; it is an obligation—in this cultural construct of ours—for children to rise to the defence of their parents, no matter what infamy or perfidy the said parent might have dabbled in.

The problem I have with your letter, however, arises from two issues: (i) your disparaging of Wole Soyinka, who—despite your referral to an anecdotal opinion that calls him as “a common writer”—is a great father figure, and a source of inspiration, to a fair number of us young Nigerians; and (ii) your attempt to revise Nigerian history and substitute our national experience with your personal opinions.

Therefore, it is necessary that we who are either Wole Soyinka’s “socio-political” children, or who are ordinary Nigerians…

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She’s all of me.

From the first light of morningForbidden_Love_by_Maz6277

When I awake to a brand new day

To nighttime when I lay my head to rest

And drift into oblivion.

For her, sleep eludes me

And when it comes

It brings visions of her smile

Of her presence

Of her wondrous mind

Of her svelte body

And her amazing heart.

In her I find inspiration

And when I falter she shows mercy,

In forgiveness she encourages me,

Helping me across bridges from fear to hope.

She’s not mine

But this life is meaningless without her.

Her embodiment has filled my being

And my soul wholly consumed.

I have lost all worldly desires as she possesses me,

Praying to God that she leads me home….


For Onyinye

I love when brands get innovative and come up with ideas that engage the minds and hearts of consumers!

While surfing the web earlier today, I came across an innovative idea from household cleaning brand AJAX; (Procter and Gamble distributed it in Nigeria around year 2000 or so) an online app that helps to clean…wait for it…your social media life. Yes, clean it.

All Purpose Cleaner they said

All Purpose Cleaner they said

I know this probably sounds like a joke to you right now, and you’re wondering what a brand that’s more likely to appeal to nursing mothers or housewives would be thinking of venturing into the “cool” world of social media. But that’s exactly what the guys at P & G did.

Ajax Social Wipes as the app is called goes through your Twitter or Facebook (depends on which is dirty) and cleans it of all filth. Squeaky Clean I might add.

Go check out how dirty you are on social media and see if Ajax Social Wipes can get you clean.


A few days back, the Nigerian President signed into law a bill criminalizing same sex marriages and unions in Nigeria. The bill I must say (even from a layman’s point of view) is as ambiguous as it gets. The position of the Government and most of the supporters of the new law is three pronged; One, Homosexuality is foreign and not in line with the cultures of the over ethnic 250 groups that make up this country called Nigeria. Secondly, they argue that the activities of gay people are against all religious doctrines and teachings. This in a Secular state. The third arm of their pitch-fork is that homosexuality is a neo-colonialist practice, being force fed to us by the West. They make these wonderful assertion from the comfort of their western invented iPads and smartphones, blind to the fact that homosexuality has existed in African societies before a white man ever landed in these parts.

To clear the muddy waters of this whole issue, my friend Ayo Sogunro, a lawyer and a writer whose latest book SORRY TALES has received much critical acclaim, has written the article below. He is as straight in his sexual orientation as Solomon (well, maybe without so many partners)  and has been one of those calling for reason in the face of the homophobic display of ignorance being peddled by most Nigerians, including some very notable persons in the entertainment sector.

In the article, he breaks down the law and its true (read Nigerian) interpretation. Bringing to the attention of those who are prematurely applauding the law as the best thing since the introduction of the GSM, that the ambiguity of the law puts all Nigerians at risk of witch-hunting and invasion of privacy by our dear officers of the law. Read the article below.



Congratulations, straight Nigerian, this article is for your benefit. Now that the Same-Sex Marriage Act has been signed, you can breathe easy—or so you think. Well, not so fast—and the following paragraphs will explain why.

However, as is usual in my articles of this controversial nature, I will assume you are a reasonable Nigerian (maybe one who hates homosexuality a tad—or even a whole lot—that’s fine) but not one who thinks stoning a homosexual person to death is some sort of divine injunction—or that armed robbers are preferable to lesbians. If you’re the latter type of person, don’t bother reading this article, there are more important things for you to do: like amending your new law to allow you to directly murder gays and rape lesbians and save costs on the whole jailing thing.

But for the rest of you, well meaning, straight Nigerians, here are a few things that you should get—well, straight—about the new anti-gay law. So you can keep up with me, download a copy of the Same Sex Bill here.

1. The Law Is Not About Marriage: Fine, the proper name of the law is titled “Same Sex Marriage Act” and the general rationale from the sponsors of the bill is something to the effect that “gay marriage” was a devaluation of African and religious family values and similar nice sounding ideas taken right out of the holy books—which sounds like divorce ought to be a crime too, though nobody seems to mind that. But don’t be deceived by the PR, the anti-gay law is just that: an anti-gay law. As a matter of fact, homosexual marriage has always been invalid in Nigeria since British rule—this so-called innovation is simply about punishing homosexuality. Let’s start with s.1(1) of the law: “Marriage contract or civil union entered between persons of same gender is hereby prohibited in Nigeria”. Did you notice the “civil union” part? That means, even non-marital relationships are prohibited and criminalised. And just to drive the point home—in case you’re still arguing from the “marriage” angle—the law goes on to describe “civil union” to include: “independent relationships, caring partnership, civil solidarity pacts, domestic partnerships, reciprocal beneficiary relationships, significant relationships”, and a host of other non-existent types of relationships borne out of a level of paranoia that is matched only by the political system’s level of corruption. In short, gay/lesbian relationships of any type are criminalised—whether marital or not. And this is why, before the President could even pocket his signing pen, Bauchi State had already arrested people under the fresh law. Did these people organise a marriage ceremony while the law was being signed? If that is not proof that this has nothing to do with marriage, then you tell me what is proof.

And the next time some religious person argues  for the law on the premise that marriage should be only between a man or a woman, ask the person: “Fine, but what about a reciprocal beneficial relationship?”

Whatever the hell that means.

2. The Law Doesn’t Care About Deterring Homosexuality: See, ordinarily, an activity becomes worthy of criminal status when people keep reporting to the police that it has begun to affect them negatively. And so it becomes necessary to deter that rampant activity. Crimes don’t come out of the blue—they are a result of problematic activity in a society. Well, this law is notdeterring gay marriage because gay marriage isn’t an activity in Nigeria. It’s not even deterring gay relationships because gay relationships are virtually secret in Nigeria. Secret to the point of non-existent. Instead, it is a witch-hunting law—one that punishes people whose opinions differ, even if the said opinions are not causing any problems. The law is a solution to a non-existent problem. Take, for example, s.4(1): “The registration of gay clubs, societies and organisations, their sustenance, processions and meetings are hereby prohibited.” Meetings? Even armed robbers are not guilty of merely “meeting”. A meeting—and nothing more—doesn’t even hurt a fly. That’s like jailing union leaders for meeting to discuss a strike—in a democracy. Come on, they were probably meeting to discuss how not to be gay in a homophobic country! The law isn’t interested in the substance of the meeting; it is only interested in jailing the attendees.

And if anyone should be jailed for meetings that harm the country, it should be the Federal Executive Council!

3. The Law Punishes YOU, Even If You’re Definitely Straight: Take s.5(3), which is probably the most unfair punishment ever given to anybody for just being nice to another person: “Any persons or group of persons that witnesses, and aids the solemnisation of a same sex marriage contract or civil union or supports the registration of gay clubs, societies and organisations, processions or meetings in Nigeria commits an offence and liable on conviction on conviction to a term of 10 years imprisonment.” Here’s the deal: You will go to jail for 10 years, because you were cool enough to look the other way when you saw women making out. Why? Because you supported a same-sex civil union. In short, you will get jailed for having an opinion differing from the government’s opinion. You get jailed for being a reasonable straight person. Remember the “meetings” part? You will be sentenced to 10 years in jail forsupporting a meeting. In other words: report any gay/lesbian persons and activity or go to jail with them. Don’t forget, the law isn’t limited to marriage—it affects other types of homosexual relationships.

Summary: This law also affects heterosexual relationships. Because God wants to see straight people sent to jail for refusing to be judgmental.

 4. The Law Doesn’t Safeguard You: Fine, so you’re straight through and through. And fine, you have no problem about informing on gay people in your neighbourhood—in fact, you are positively excited about this particular civic duty. But what happens when YOU are accused by someone else? See, there are no standards of proof beyond being involved in a “civil union”, a phrase whose definition means a whole lot of nonsense. Take s. 4(2): “The public show of same sex amorous relationship directly or indirectly is hereby prohibited.” “Same sex amorous relationship”. This means, kissing, hugging, hand-holding, or other forms of affectionate—amorous—contact between the same gender is now prohibited in Nigeria. If you think this is a safe risk, wait till you are arrested and then try to prove otherwise. Maybe, a judge may ultimately find you not guilty, but think of the Nigerian justice system, and you will shiver at what powers to investigate your sexual life has been handed over to the Nigerian police.

5. The Law Is Set Up To Violate Privacy: In case, you didn’t know it, here’s what s.37 of the Nigerian Constitution assures every Nigerian: “The privacy of citizens…is hereby guaranteed and protected” which is a principal reason policemen are not allowed to spy into your bedroom without a warrant. Now, instead, the anti-gay law states in s.5(2) that “Any person who…directly or indirectly make a public show of same sex amorous relationship commits an offence and shall each be liable on conviction to a term of 10 years imprisonment.” Now, tie that law to the police powers of investigation and you will get the problem in at least 4 steps.

Step 1: the law ordinarily permits the police to investigate and arrest a personsuspected of committing an offence in Nigeria.

Step 2: It is now an offence in Nigeria to directly or indirectly display same sex affection.

Step 3: the police (or someone else) is suspicious that you are committing this offence and the police wants to investigate your sexual life—to prove you’re not gay.

Step 4: There goes your private life.

Now, repeat Steps 1 to 4. This time between a male police officer and a female suspect.

6. The Law Is Plain Weird, Even By Nigerian Standards: Just take the basics, simple definitions: the definition of “civil union” isn’t closed, and can legitimately mean two girls sharing an apartment; “amorous relationship” is not defined and so even heterosexual greetings can be maliciously interpreted as the expression of a homosexual relationship; words like “support”, “meetings” are used carelessly without defined categories and exceptions; the burden of proof is not stated; the law does not provide for categories of unintentional or “inadvertent” offenders; and worse—it is a retrospective, and even retroactive, law—a type of law strongly disapproved of by our constitution. In summary, it’s a very lazy law—the kind a mob will hurriedly put together just to legalise their murderous instincts. But, you see, you can’t amend such a law to take care of these issues—because they deal with private matters that are difficult to enforce by the public without sacrificing people in the process.

And that is why every sensible legal system understands that what goes on in a person’s underwear is not the business of the law—to the extent that person hasn’t dragged in an unwilling third party.

But Nigeria has never been noted for being sensible.


Our society tolerates gross unfairness every day. It tolerates misogyny, racism and the callous indifference to those born without privilege.

But we manage to find endless umbrage for petty slights and small-time favoritism.

When a teacher gives one student a far better grade than he deserves, and does it without shame, we’re outraged. When the flight attendant hands that last chicken meal to our seatmate, wow, that’s a slight worth seething over for hours.

When Bull Connor directed fire hoses and attack dogs on innocent kinds in Birmingham, it conflated the two, the collision of the large and the small. Viewers didn’t witness the centuries of implicit and explicit racism, they saw a small, vivid act, moving in its obvious unfairness. It was the small act that focused our attention on the larger injustice.

I think that most of us are programmed to process the little stories, the emotional ones, things that touch people we can connect to. When it requires charts and graphs and multi-year studies, it’s too easy to ignore.

We don’t change markets, or populations, we change people. One person at a time, at a human level. And often, that change comes from small acts that move us, not from grand pronouncements.


New Message!

Posted: January 15, 2014 in Poetry, Summons
Tags: , , , , ,

A swallowtail once took a message
From your lips to Mine,
The message was the sweetest and best it could find.
I found the answer in your eyes in a moment full of bliss…
The message was “I love you”
The answer was a kiss.

The Bible is an Ocean

Posted: January 7, 2014 in Summons

Diamond Mike Watson


Is everything in the Bible? Is there some ancient mystery of life that was left out? The Bible is an ocean. It contains fierce sharks and gentle dolphins. Everything one needs to know to live a fulfilling, happy life is contained between its covers. The problem is that one must paddle through its pages, separating the calm water from the crashing waves. Is every single word God-breathed? Is every verse inspired by God? How do you feel when a particular verse is read? Does it speak to your heart? People like to trust the written word because they yearn for something to hold onto, called truth. Does every written word really answer the puzzle of life?

The teachings of Jesus, however, are simple. Without complex words, Jesus used parables to encourage people to think. A commandment Jesus taught was to love one’s neighbor as oneself. It seemed that Jesus could…

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Dear Onyinyechi,

When I began thinking up this letter, my head was not in the least bit clear. I know you’ll tease that Harp must have caused that, but just this once it wasn’t(perhaps the guys at Guinness need to start paying me for all my love for the Harp brand). I was sitting beside you at the only place you said you liked that night. We had done a trip of about 3 clubs looking for where to “chill” on a Friday night, but none until this one seemed to lift your dour mood.

I was somewhat concerned. I had never seen you this detached and guarded. I asked repeatedly if I had done anything to upset you, but you maintained that it was just “your regular mood”. You jest surely. Your regular mood for me is; witty, determined, engaging and not too shy to throw in that distinct laughter of yours to accentuate a conversation.

I have gone so far off course. I am writing this staring at you sleeping. It’s almost 7am, somehow you had slept off midway into putting your hair in rollers, and still in that lovely dress you wore yesterday, your head is ever so slightly on the pillow as you sweetly doze. I should take a picture. Something to record this priceless moment for all eternity, but something within me tells me there will be thousand other moments such as this to choose from.

It’s been so difficult for me these past 16 months to open my heart to beauty and the music that is borne of such a wondrous being such as you. I had sealed myself off from the world, hiding loneliness and the void behind a facade of being a workaholic. It’s been a most interesting period.

I have paused again. Watching the rhythmic rise and fall of your chest as you breathe, praying to God  to keep you till time loses all value. Your cute nose; ever so deftly placed by the grand maestro Himself like on a painting that even Michelangelo would have gaped at in awe. The lips, oh those lips that remind me of succulent grapes nurtured to perfection for the delicacy of near-gods…

I don’t know how this has happened, that one minute, I was devoid of any reason to believe that this life would be smiled upon by cupid, the other now asking myself if there was no need to make my house more comfortable for you as a woman. I make mental notes to get all the things you have requested for but I’ve not been able to provide. You see, my house has always been a house to me. There’s has been no one to share it with, so the business of turning it into a home has always been left on the back-burner. I had been successful at turning my back on love, content with accepting the crumbs of lust and transient obsessions. Anything just to feel the emptiness within. But here I feel the fullness of joy.

These are early days yet, and the fact that the journey is long and full of promise sets forth a fountain of hope in me. And as this New Year begins, I pray it grants us joy unequalled, the sort that God grants specially to those who follow His will.

Thanks for bringing sunshine and rain into this dark, deserted arid land.

Yours always,