Posts Tagged ‘Brands’

I love when brands get innovative and come up with ideas that engage the minds and hearts of consumers!

While surfing the web earlier today, I came across an innovative idea from household cleaning brand AJAX; (Procter and Gamble distributed it in Nigeria around year 2000 or so) an online app that helps to clean…wait for it…your social media life. Yes, clean it.

All Purpose Cleaner they said

All Purpose Cleaner they said

I know this probably sounds like a joke to you right now, and you’re wondering what a brand that’s more likely to appeal to nursing mothers or housewives would be thinking of venturing into the “cool” world of social media. But that’s exactly what the guys at P & G did.

Ajax Social Wipes as the app is called goes through your Twitter or Facebook (depends on which is dirty) and cleans it of all filth. Squeaky Clean I might add.

Go check out how dirty you are on social media and see if Ajax Social Wipes can get you clean.

 

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The Paint Job Method

The brand gurus have left your office after a 4 hour long strategy session, and after filling your minds and ears with new found vigour  inspired you to rebrand, rebrand and rebrand!! So you get your own team together and charge them to go out and find the best new colours that depict strength, loyalty, innovation, consistency and every new age adjective or noun you can muster. To the mix, you throw in a new logo as well, “one that is in line with what the brand represents” and put in a call to the guys at Dulux; “40 litres of your best silk finish royal blue paint for our head office please”. And the rush begins as you rebrand, rebrand and rebrand. But are you on the right course? What is it that your brand truly represents? Is your brand personality or character in line with all the new age buzz words and fancy colors and shapes you have put into the creative representation of your brand or are you just going devil-may-care into the market with a brand representation that you and your team do not have the wherewithal to defend if questions arise?

What is your brand character anyways? Why is it any different from what your colours and logos represent, why does it transcend the scope of the visual-intangible to the level of visual/non-visual-tangible? Your brand character/personality is a set of human characteristics that are attributed to your brand name. Something to which your consumers can relate; and your brand can increase its brand equity by staying consistent to these values. This is the added-value that a brand gains, aside from its functional benefits.

Five main types of brand personalities exist: excitement, sincerity, ruggedness, competence and sophistication. Here are examples of traits for the different types of brand personalities:

Excitement: carefree, spirited, youthful
Sincerity: genuine, kind, family-oriented, thoughtful
Ruggedness: rough, tough, outdoors, athletic
Competence: successful, accomplished, influential, a leader
Sophistication: elegant, prestigious, pretentious

Once consumers can identify with any of these traits as is represented by your brand or organization, then they are most willing to part with their money to pay for your goods and services.

But herein lies the big question; is your brand true to what it represents? If customers remove that fine coat of new paint will they see that underneath all the razzmatazz is a poor organizational structure, an internal discord with the values of say fairness that your company encapsulates? If they see that in as much as your brand portrays innovation and growth, the systems that exist for your staff to bring out these innovative ideas and products are at best circa 1960, then big problem. But we see this every day.

Charity they say begins at home, and what is most important in your brand-building (or rebuilding) efforts is that you must walk the talk. You must ensure that before the new business cards and letter heads are ordered, that you have engaged in serious soul searching, ensuring that you do not shoot yourself in the foot by choosing a brand personality that you cannot stay true to.

Let rebranding start inside out. Build the ideals that you want your brand to represent and be known for, from the very structure and foundation on which your company or organization is built. From the driver to the CEO, ensure that every member of your team stands for what your brand represents as they engage customers and clients and if possible as they go about on their own personal lives. The very essence of rebranding is to ensure that the outside stays consistent with the new found inner convictions that you have paid a ton of cash to hear from the brand strategist and gurus.

Drop the paint bucket, call your team together, and maybe as you all sit in a circle and sing Kumbaya you will find the values and ideals that you can infuse and consider as you rebuild a new corporate image on a foundation that will not be found wanting come whatever storm may arise on that perilous ocean called the market place.

SETH GODIN: Overstimulated

Posted: September 27, 2012 in Summons
Tags: , , ,

Time to pay attention to the Weber-Fechner Law.

It’s easier to tell the difference between two bags of flour that are three ounces apart in weight when one weighs a pound, than it is to tell the difference between two bags that are three ounces apart when one weighs twenty pounds.

It’s easier to tell the difference between two flashlights that are 6 lumens apart when one is just 2 lumens bright than it is to tell them apart when one is 200 lumens.

The more stimulus you’re getting (light, sound, pressure, delight, sadness) the less easily you can notice a small change. That seems obvious, but it’s worth saying.

If you’re entering a market filled with loudness, it’s harder to be noticed, even if the incremental benefit you offer seems large to you. If you’re trying to delight existing customers, the more delighted they already are, the more new delight you need to offer to turn heads.

One more reason to seek out those that are both interested and underserved.

 

SETH GODIN

There’s no doubt that it’s easier to start an organization (or a project) around specific.

The more specific the better. When you have a handful of ideal potential clients and a solution that is customized and perfect for them, it’s far easier to get started than when you offer everything to everyone.

Not only that, but the specific makes it easier to be remarkable, to overdeliver and to create conversations, because you know precisely what will delight the user.

Once you master your specific, you can do the work to become general, because you have cash flow and reputation and experience.

The flipside of this is interesting: if you have somehow, against all odds, managed to succeed in the general, the move to specific is almost effortless. If you can change your reflex action that consistently pushes you to mass, the market you’ve chosen will embrace the fact that you, the general one, are now truly focused on them, the specifics.

Seth Godin

Wildeyeq